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Scotophorus pro phosphoro inventus, written by Johann Schulze in 1727, was the origin for experiments with light-based imaging that would lead to William Henry Fox Talbot’s experiments with camera-less photogenic drawings. The ability to record ‘marks of light’ without a lens, first explored in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, provides the foundation for my series of light-based images of museum objects from the history of science titled Collecting Shadows.

Model of earthquake motion on 1/15/1887 near Yokohama, Seikei Sekiya, 1889, courtesy of the Whipple Museum of the History of Science, Cambridge University
Mathematical string model, Martin Schilling 19th C., courtesy of Whipple Museum of the History of Science, Cambridge University
Structure of protein chains, Linus Pauling, c.1935, courtesy of the Linus Pauling Archive, Oregon State University
Crystal structures, Linus Pauling, c. 1930, courtesy of the Linus Pauling Archive, Oregon State University
Planetarium, Henry Bryant, 1872, courtesy of Whipple Museum of the History of Science, Cambridge University
Glass celestial sphere, John Cowley, 1739, courtesy of Science Museum Group
Electron density map of penicillin, Dorothy Hodgkin, c. 1945, courtesy of Science Museum Group
Models of Racemisation, Alfred Werner c.1924_courtesy of SMG
Orrery, William Newton and Sons, London c.1863_courtesy of SMG
Ptolemy and Copernicus, planetaria c. 1700, courtesy of Museum of History of Science, University of Oxford
Michael Faraday's chemistry chest, 19th C., courtesy of Science Museum Group
Bubble chamber film, CERN, 20th C., courtesy of Science Museum Group
Proposed Structure for the Nucleic Acids, Linus Pauling, 1951, courtesy of the Linus Pauling Archives, Oregon State University
Sugars, James Irvine, early 20th C., courtesy of Museums of Saint Andrews
Vacuum discharge tube, J.J. Thomson c. 1897, courtesy of Whipple Museum of the History of Science, Cambridge University
Disharge tube for original mass spectrograph, Francis Aston, 1919, courtesy of Science Museum Group
Crystalline Structure of Apatite_courtesy of SMG
Crystalline Structure of Garnet_courtesy of SMG
Structure of Sperm Whale Myoglobin, John Kendrew and Max Perutz_courtesy of MRC-LMB
Molecular Model of Sodium Chloride 1926, courtesy of SMG)
Structure of Double Helix, Francis Crick after 1953_courtesy of MRC-LMB
Molecular Model of Polypeptide Chain, Francis Crick and Alexander Rich c.1955_courtesy of MRC-LMB
Structure of t-RNA, Alexander Rich and Elizabeth Cavicchi 1975, courtesy of MIT Museum
Electron Density Map of Penicillin, Dorothy Hodgkin, courtesy of Museum of History of Science, University of Oxford))
Structure of 2 zinc pig insulin, Dorothy Hodgkin, c.1967, courtesy of Science Museum Group
Structure of the enzyme chymotripsin, 1972, courtesy of the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge University
Hourglasses, 17th-19th C., courtesy of Whipple Museum of the History of Science, Cambridge University